DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-3933.ijam20162526

Clinicoepidemiological and histopathological study of cutaneous amyloidosis with histopathological correlation

Kavita Kilaparty, Lavanya Maripati

Abstract


Background: Primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis is a commonly encountered problem in our scenario. As there is paucity of Indian studies on this subject, a clinico-epidemiological study was carried out. Objectives of the study were to make an insight into the common clinical variants of primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis, to compare the age and sex distribution of various forms of PLCA, to study the etiological factors involved in primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis and to study the incidence, association, distribution, and histological correlation of PLCA.

Methods: Patients having features of primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis attending the outpatient Department of Dermatology, Image Hospitals Hyderabad, India from June 2009 to 2010 was be enrolled into the study. Collection of data by history taking, clinical examination and skin biopsy was done in selected cases.

Results: Positive family history was noted in a considerable number of patients. Pigmented macules with rippled pattern in macular amyloidosis and pigmented hyperkeratotic papules in lichen amyloidosis are the most common presentations and a combination of macular and lichen amyloidosis is seen in biphasic amyloidosis. Site most commonly involved in macular amyloidosis is extensor aspect of arm and anterior aspect of lower leg in lichen amyloidosis.

Conclusions: Nodular cutaneous amyloidosis and sometimes lichen amyloidosis are associated with systemic amyloidosis. So such patents likely to develop systemic amyloidosis should be screen internally to rule out systemic amyloidosis.


Keywords


Primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis, Macular amyloidosis, Lichen amyloidosis, Biphasic amyloidosis

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References


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