DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-3933.ijam20200652

Clinical profile of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at a tertiary care hospital

Prasuna K. R., Praveena Korani Ratnam, Pramod Kumar K. R., Krishna Kumar T. V. K.

Abstract


Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease progresses if the exposure to aggravating factors continues. As lung function is declined, even after exposure is reduced or totally stopped, the COPD continues to progress though may be at a slower pace and as an effect of increasing age. Objective of the study was to study the clinical profile of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at a tertiary care hospital.

Methods: A hospital based cross sectional study was carried out among 30 patients as decided by inclusion and exclusion criteria at MediCiti Institute of Medical Sciences, Medchal from November 2012 to June 2014. Detailed history, detailed clinical examination, Systemic examination and Forced expiratory volume (FEV1) was done for all patients included. Pack years of smoking was calculated. Data was entered in Excel worksheet and analyzed using proportions.

Results: Maximum number of patients was in age group of 60-69 years (36.67%). Majority were males i.e. 83.34%. Smoking was major risk factor. Maximum number of patients (90%) had symptoms of less than one year of duration. Maximum number of patients (80%) had moderate to severe airflow obstruction at time of presentation and only 13.34% had mild disease. Four patients had mild form of the disease. Majority of patients with severe to very severe disease had more than 20 pack years. All patients in the study had breathlessness at the time of presentation. Wheeze and Crepitations were present in 96.66% of patients.

Conclusions: Smoking has been found to be the major risk factor and it was positively correlated with the severity of COPD.


Keywords


Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Clinical profile

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