DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-3933.ijam20203494

Detection and comparison of malaria by conventional, rapid immuno chromatographic and molecular technique

Manonmoney Jayaraman, Sourav Das

Abstract


Background: Mosquito-borne diseases are the major concern in public health. Malaria is a protozoal disease caused by the parasites of the Genus Plasmodium - Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium ovale, which are transmitted by the bite of female Anopheles mosquitoes. Prevalence of malaria worldwide is about 35%. Malarial infections can be diagnosed by peripheral smear, rapid immunochromatography and molecular technique. This study is focused on Plasmodium species detection by using species specific primers for diagnosis. Aim and objective of this study was to detect and compare the Plasmodium species by conventional, rapid immunochromatographic and molecular technique in patients suspected for pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) attending a tertiary care hospital.

Methods: The study was carried out at SRM MCH and RC, Tamil Nadu, India, from January 2018 to February 2019 after the institutional ethical committee approval. This was an observational study. Malarial parasites were identified in peripheral blood smear by conventional method (thick smear and thin smear), rapid immunochromatographic technique (serological technique using whole blood) and molecular technique. DNA extraction from whole blood done by spine column technique. Amplification and gel documentation done.

Results: Total 83 blood samples were collected from patients with clinical diagnosis of PUO. Out of 83 samples 5 (6%) samples were positive for Plasmodium vivax species by conventional method, rapid immunochromatographic and molecular technique.

Conclusions: In this study, Plasmodium vivax is the species identified by conventional peripheral blood smear method, rapid immunochromatographic and molecular method.


Keywords


Immunochromatography, Mosquito-borne, Peripheral smear, Plasmodium, Pyrexia of unknown origin, Polymerase chain reaction

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