DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-3933.ijam20220026
Published: 2022-01-25

A study of correlation of pulmonary function test in patients with metabolic syndrome with different components of metabolic syndrome

Prabhu S., Sudha Karbari

Abstract


Background: The increasing incidence of metabolic syndrome has been on the rise especially in urban population and leading to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus. It has been associated with impairment of pulmonary functions. However, there is limited data regarding the association with individual components of metabolic syndrome and overall effect on components of pulmonary functions.

Methods: This is a cross sectional study consisting of 50 subjects with metabolic syndrome. All the subjects underwent pulmonary function tests and the association between different components of metabolic syndrome and pulmonary function were examined using unpaired t-test and Pearson’s partial correlation coefficient. This data was analysed by using statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) version 12.0.

Results: In females, moderate negative significant correlation was seen between forced vital capacity (FVC) and systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting blood sugar (FBS), triglyceride (TG), waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) whereas positive weak non-significant correlation was seen between FVC and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), while no such relation was found with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). In males, negative, moderate significant correlation was seen between FVC and FBS whereas strong, positive, significant correlation was seen between FVC and WC; between FVC and BMI. Negative, moderate, significant correlation was seen between FEV1 and WC; between FEV1 and BMI.

Conclusions: Our study concluded that there was a significant impact of FBS and WC on decreasing FVC on both genders with minimally significant impact of other components of metabolic syndrome on FVC with no effect on FEV1 hence indicating a restrictive pattern of pulmonary function derangement. Hence, further studies with larger sample size is needed to confirm whether there are direct or indirect mechanisms through which insulin resistance could affect pulmonary function.


Keywords


Metabolic syndrome, Pulmonary function test, Forced vital capacity, Obesity, Insulin resistance

Full Text:

PDF

References


Wang J, Ruotsalainen S, Moilanen L, Lepistö P, Laakso M, Kuusisto J. The metabolic syndrome predicts cardiovascular mortality: a 13-year follow-up study in elderly non-diabetic Finns. Eur Heart J. 2007;28(7):857-64.

Nakajima K, Kubouchi Y, Muneyuki T, Ebata M, Eguchi S, Munakata H. A possible association between suspected restrictive pattern as assessed by ordinary pulmonary function test and the metabolic syndrome. Chest. 2008;134(4):712-8.

Chaudhary SC, Kumari T, Usman K, Sawlani KK, Himanshu D, Gupta KK, Patel ML, Agarwal A, Verma AK. Study of Pulmonary Function Test Abnormalities in Metabolic Syndrome. J Assoc Phys India. 2018;66:27.

Chen W-L, Wang C-C, Wu L-W, Kao T-W, Chan JY-H, Chen Y-J, et al. Relationship between Lung Function and Metabolic Syndrome. PloS One. 2014;9(10):e108989.

Salome CM, King GG, Berend N. Physiology of obesity and effects on lung function. Journal of applied physiology. 2010;108(1):206-11.

Grundy SM, Cleeman JI, Daniels SR, Donato KA, Eckel RH, Franklin BA, et al. Diagnosis and management of the metabolic syndrome: an American Heart Association/ National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Scientific Statement. Circulation. 2005;112:2735-52.

Ahirwar R, Mondal PR. Prevalence of obesity in India: A systematic review. Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clin Res Rev. 2019;13(1):318-21.

McClean KM, Kee F, Young IS, Elborn JS. Obesity and the lung: 1. Epidemiology. Thorax. 2008;63:649-54.

Kushner RF. Evaluation and Management of Obesity. Kasper D, Fauci A, Hauser S, Longo D, Jameson J, Loscalzo J. Harrison's principles of internal medicine. 19th edition. Mcgraw-hill. 2015;2844.

Koenig SM. Pulmonary complications of obesity. Am J Med Sci. 2001;321:249-79.

Hole DJ, Watt GC, Davey-Smith G, Hart CL, Gillis CR, Hawthorne VM. Impaired lung function and mortality risk in men and women: findings from the Renfrew and Paisley prospective population study. BMJ. 1996;313:711-5.

Leone N, Courbon D, Thomas F, Bean K, Jego B, Leynaert B, et al. Lung function impairment and metabolic syndrome: the critical role of abdominal obesity. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009;179:509-16.

Ford ES, Mannino DM. Prospective association between lung function and the incidence of diabetes: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. Diabetes Care. 2004;27:2966-70.

Harik-Khan RI, Wise RA, Fleg JL. The effect of gender on the relationship between body fat distribution and lung function. J Clin Epidemiol. 2001;54:399-406.

Sutherland TJ, Goulding A, Grant AM, Cowan JO, Williamson A, Williams SM, Skinner MA, Taylor DR. The effect of adiposity measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry on lung function. Eur Respir J. 2008;32:85-91.

Franssen FM, O’Donnell DE, Goossens GH, Blaak EE, Schols AM. Obesity and the lung: 5. Obesity and COPD. Thorax. 2008;63:1110-7.

Reaven GM. Banting lecture 1988: role of insulin resistance in human disease. Diabetes. 1988;37:1595-607.

Bottai M, Pistelli F, Di Pede F, Carrozzi L, Baldacci S, Matteelli G, Scognamiglio A, Viegi G. Longitudinal changes of body mass index, spirometry and diffusion in a general population. Eur Respir J. 2002;20(3):665-73.

Barbalho-Moulim MC, Miguel GP, Forti EM, Campos FA, Peixoto-Souza FS, Costa D. Pulmonary Function after Weight Loss in Obese Women Undergoing Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: One-Year Followup. ISRN Obes. 2013;796454.